Strathmore Community Rugby Trust is delighted to announce that we are re-starting our Walking Rugby sessions this Friday (23 October) at Strathmore Rugby Club in Forfar.  We are also adding a second session to our timetable which will run on a Monday evening, also at the Rugby Club.

Walking Rugby is a slower, non-contact version of rugby for adults (male and female) who are looking for a fun way to increase their levels of activity.  It is suitable for those recovering from illness or injury, retired players and older people looking to stay fit and active.  The aim is to participate, compete and (most importantly) enjoy yourself!

The sessions will take place at the following times:

Anyone interested in finding out more information or who would like to take part is asked to contact Maggie Lawrie by emailing info@strathmoretrust.co.uk or calling 07771 867059.

Click on the link below to read Willie’s story to hear how Walking Rugby has benefited him.

Willie’s Story

 

 

Strathmore Community Rugby Trust has been recognised for its work promoting community health and wellbeing through rugby with a win at the 2020 Scottish Charity Awards.

 

Last month The Trust was named as a Finalist in two categories of Scottish Charity Awards (SCA).  Run annually by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) to celebrate the best of Scotland’s voluntary sector, this year’s awards saw the Trust as the only Angus Finalist.

 

The winners were announced in a live online event on Friday night (September 25). The Trust was named the winner for the Pioneering Project award for bringing Autism-Friendly Rugby for primary pupils to Scotland. The award was decided by a judging panel.

 

The Trust’s Autism-Friendly Rugby for primary children initiative, now sponsored by Shepherd Chartered Surveyors, was introduced to Scotland in May last year. Its sessions create a positive learning environment for children with or undergoing diagnosis for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their siblings to have fun while developing confidence and social skills as well as general physical literacy and sporting skills. They also provide respite and social contact for parents and carers.

 

The Trust was also a Finalist in the People’s Choice Award, voted on by 27,719 members of the public. This year’s Scottish Charity Awards shortlist included 45 individuals and organisations from charities and voluntary groups across the country.

 

Speaking about its first success at the Scottish Charity Awards while accepting the award on behalf of the Trust, Community Project Coordinator Maggie Lawrie, said: “We are absolutely over the moon to have won! We’ve received so much support for the project – not only within our immediate community but also from partner organisations. It’s great that all the hard work which has gone into making Autism-Friendly Rugby a success has now been recognised.

 

“A massive thank you has to go to the coaches and volunteers who deliver the sessions. They have a very special bond with the players and it’s a joy to see the players, coaches and volunteers develop through rugby – it’s what the Trust is all about.”

 

Paul Taylor, Partner of trust sponsors Shepherd Chartered Surveyors said: “As the main sponsor of Autism-Friendly Rugby, Shepherds Surveyors is delighted to see the project and those who deliver it recognised in this way. Autism-Friendly Rugby is a pioneering project which deserves the recognition it is receiving.”

 

Stewart Harris, Chief Executive, sportscotland said: “It is fantastic to see this initiative to make sport more accessible recognised in these awards. Sport and physical activity contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of our nation, and projects like this one have an important role to play in making that happen.”

 

The Trust was founded in 2017 to increase public participation in sport, particularly rugby union and rugby league, in the Forfar, Kirriemuir and Brechin areas to benefit community health and wellbeing as well as develop young people into healthy, positive members of the community through the positive ethos and values of rugby.

 

It’s based at Strathmore Rugby Club in Forfar and works in partnership with Strathmore RFC, Brechin RFC, sportscotland, Scottish Rugby and Scotland Rugby League.

The Trust would like to say a massive THANK YOU to Craig Angus who recently undertook a massive 22 mile run from his house in Forfar to the Glen Clova Hotel.  Not only is the distance impressive, he also had to deal with a steady climb of over 500 feet to reach his destination.

Craig decided to do the run to raise funds for the Trust’s Unified Rugby Team, which he is involved with.  The funds will be used to buy the Strathie Clan some kit.

Craig totally smashed his target of raising £500 for the Clan, and his last total was just over £1100.  Well done Craig and we hope the legs recover soon!!

If you would like to more information about how you can support the Trust visit the Support Us section of our website and scroll down the page for lots of ideas – https://www.strathmoretrust.co.uk/support-us/.

Strathmore Community Rugby Trust are finalists in two categories (Pioneering Project and People’s Choice) at the 2020 Scottish Charity Awards for our Autism Friendly Rugby project!

We need your help!

If you believe sport, especially rugby, has the power to change lives and support communities, please take a minute to:

  1. Vote for us – Link Below
  2. Post a short video challenging 5 friends to do the same within 24 hours with #VoteStrathmoreTrust and #PassItOn

To vote visit https://scvo.scot/scottish-charity-awards/finalists-2020/pioneering-project/autism-friendly-rugby-strathmore-community-rugby-trust.

Full info – https://www.strathmoretrust.co.uk/scottish-charity-awards-finalists/.

#VoteStrathmoreTrust  #DevelopingPeopleThroughRugby

Strathmore Community Rugby Trust is enjoying a second high-profile recognition of its work promoting community health and wellbeing through rugby just days after HRH The Earl of Forfar became its Royal Patron.

 

 

 

 

 

Last week, on August 3, The Strathmore Community Rugby Trust (SCRT) announced that His Royal Highness the Earl of Forfar (Prince Edward) had become its Royal Patron. Today, just 11 days later, it’s being announced as a Finalist in two categories of Scottish Charity Awards (SCA), run annually by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) to celebrate the best of Scotland’s voluntary sector. It’s the only Angus Finalist.

 

The Trust recently got the great news it is a Finalist for the Pioneering Project award for bringing Autism-Friendly Rugby for primary pupils to Scotland last year. That will be decided by a judging panel and announced on September 25 in a virtual awards ceremony.

 

As a result of being a Finalist in that, the Trust is also a Finalist in the People’s Choice Award, voted for by the public. So it’s challenging the people of Angus to not just vote for it but also ‘Pass It On’ by posting a short video on social media saying they’ve done so and nominating five pals to do the same by the September 4 voting deadline.

 

This year’s Scottish Charity Awards shortlist includes 45 individuals and organisations from charities and voluntary groups across the country. While a judging panel will determine the winners under eight categories, members of the public can have their say by voting for their favourite overall entry in the People’s Choice Award – by visiting scvo.org.uk/vote – before 5pm on Friday 4 September 2020.

 

The full list of finalists can be found on the SCA website. Due to the impact of Covid-19, this year the awards will run a little differently. Winners will be announced on 25 September (rescheduled from June) and will now take place online so all finalists and attendees who wish to attend are still able to join the celebrations in a safe way, regardless of lockdown phase or shielding status.

 

Anna Fowlie, Chief Executive of SCVO, said: “Much of the work celebrated this year predates the pandemic.  All aspects of our lives have been disrupted in 2020. Our communities and the charities, voluntary groups and social enterprises they rely on have been under enormous pressure. Scotland’s voluntary sector has never been more needed and will be essential to Scotland’s recovery. At SCVO we know that fantastic work is going on all the time and we are delighted to celebrate these achievements and successes through the Scottish Charity Awards.

 

“This year’s shortlist of 45 finalists showcases just how diverse our voluntary sector is, and highlights the fantastic work that has been going on across the country since the last Awards until March this year. The Awards are a great way of celebrating and recognising the people and organisations who make our voluntary sector a crucial part of every part of life in Scotland. Our finalists are fantastic and I would encourage everyone to support their favourite by voting in the People’s Choice Award.”

 

The Trust’s autism-friendly rugby for primary children initiative, now sponsored by Shepherd Chartered Surveyors, was introduced to Scotland in May last year. Its sessions create a positive learning environment for children with or undergoing diagnosis for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their siblings to have fun while developing confidence and social skills as well as general physical literacy and sporting skills. They also provide respite and social contact for parents and carers.

 

Speaking about its quickfire double-success, Trust Chair, Stuart Gray, said: “We’re naturally delighted to have the work and support of our volunteers, staff, sponsors and project participants recognised with these award Finals places.

 

“Here’s hoping the people of Angus can pass on the voting message so well they help us to our first national award!”

 

Paul Taylor, Partner of trust sponsors Shepherd Chartered Surveyors said: “Shepherds Surveyors are delighted to be the main sponsor for Autism-Friendly Rugby. It corresponds well with our commitment within the Angus community. Autism-Friendly Rugby is a pioneering project which deserves the Royal recognition it is receiving. We look forward to a long term-relationship with the Trust.”

 

Stewart Harris, Chief Executive, sportscotland said: “This is a fantastic initiative, making sport more accessible by listening to what matters to people and adapting to meet their needs. It is fantastic to see that work being recognised with two award nominations.

 

“Sport and physical activity contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of our nation, and projects like this one from Strathmore Community Rugby Trust have an important role to play in making that happen. This dedicated team of volunteers are playing their part in removing barriers to participation and as a result, improving their community and the lives of the people who live there.”

 

To vote for the Trust simply visit https://scvo.scot/scottish-charity-awards/finalists-2020/pioneering-project/autism-friendly-rugby-strathmore-community-rugby-trust and enter your email address.  Thank you!

A visit to see the work of an Angus sports charity so impressed HRH the Earl of Forfar last July that he’s become its Royal Patron, sent a video message of support and is planning another visit.

On July 1 last year Their Royal Highnesses the Earl and Countess of Forfar saw the work of The Strathmore Community Rugby Trust (SCRT) on their first visit to the town after gaining their new Scottish titles.

As part of an afternoon of visits to community projects, the Earl and Countess visited Inchmacoble Park, home of Strathmore RFC – where the three-year-old community trust runs a number of initiatives designed to increase communities’ participation in sport in Angus to benefit their health and wellbeing and develop people into healthy, positive members of the community.

Their Royal Highnesses saw the Stracathro Estates Rugby Academy in action, which teaches secondary pupils life skills as well as rugby, before being introduced to Rugby Academy members taking part in various rugby activities and conditioning games.

The Earl and Countess also saw the ‘Strathmore Clan’ taking part in a Unified Rugby session, which provides people with disabilities the opportunity to build confidence and social skills by engaging in a controlled game of contact rugby while also accommodating their individual needs.

The Royal couple also learned about the Trust’s autism-friendly rugby for primary children initiative, now sponsored by Shepherd Chartered Surveyors, which it introduced to Scotland in May last year. Its sessions, create a positive learning environment for children with or undergoing diagnosis for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their siblings to have fun while developing confidence and social skills as well as general physical literacy and sporting skills. They also provide respite and social contact for parents and carers.

Finally, The Earl and Countess met other people involved in the trust’s work, which also includes Walking Rugby – a slower, non-contact version best suited to adults wanting to be more physically active or recovering from illness or injury. It also helps reduce social exclusion through the post-match ‘cuppa and cake’ engagement between players.

His Royal Highness was touched at the extraordinary work done by the trust with young people, an area he has always been very interested in. He is a leading advocate of non-formal education and learning in the development of young people, has a leading role in the Duke of Edinburgh Award reaching more than 130 countries, and over many years supported charities which provide opportunities for children through The Wessex Youth Trust. So when SCRT asked if he would agree to be its Royal Patron, the Earl naturally agreed.

His Royal Highness also kindly sent a video message of support, saying: “Making sport and sports clubs truly open, welcoming and accessible for all members of the community is much harder than you might think. When Sophie and I visited the Strathmore Community Rugby Trust we were truly impressed by the range of people engaged, especially the inclusion of those with autism. Rugby is not exactly the first sport one might introduce to those with autism, yet here they all were and having great fun.

“While full-on, full-contact rugby might not be for everyone, there are a surprisingly wide variety of options of the game catering for all ages and abilities, even for those who prefer just walking. It is also evident that families can benefit from the sport even if they aren’t playing.

“It is charities like Strathmore Community Rugby Trust and the brilliant people that run them that provide such wonderful opportunities for all. This is an organisation that the community of Forfar and Angus should be proud of and I sincerely hope that with your support and encouragement will continue to grow and flourish.”

Trust Chair, Stuart Gray, said: “Thank you to His Royal Highness for agreeing to become our Royal Patron and his kind words. When we set up the trust three years ago, we couldn’t have imagined that by now we would have been honoured with a Royal Visit and now have a Royal patron. This is thanks to the hard work of our staff, volunteers, participants, supporters and the generosity of the Earl and Countess and our sponsors. Thanks to them all.

“We’re now looking forward to planning His Royal Highness’s next visit while we work on resuming the trust’s activities. We’re keen to hear from people young and old wanting to register to take part in our Rugby Academy, Unified Rugby, Walking Rugby and autism-friendly rugby programmes as we know these will help everyone involved recover from the physical and mental difficulties which came with lockdown.”

The trust was founded in 2017 to increase public participation in sport, particularly rugby union and rugby league, in the Forfar, Kirriemuir and Brechin areas to benefit community health and wellbeing as well as develop young people into healthy, positive members of the community through the positive ethos and values of rugby.

It’s based at Strathmore Rugby Club in Forfar and works in partnership with Strathmore RFC, Brechin RFC, sportscotland, Scottish Rugby and Scotland Rugby League. Maggie Lawrie’s role is supported by funding from the Forfar Common Good Fund, sportscotland and The Robertson Trust.